Perry housing — new, refurbished — promoted on several fronts

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Celebrating Great Western Bank's donation of $5,000 to the second new house built by Dallas County Habitat for Humanity in the 1700 block of Eight Street were, from left, Great Western Bank Perry Branch Manager Trace Schmitt, Hickman Branch Manager Nikki Mulbrook, West Des Moines Branch Manager Jasmina Odzakovic, Dallas County Habitat for Humanity Board member Sven Peterson and Dallas County Habitat for Humanity Director Omar Padilla.

Perry’s pro-housing policies received several boosts lately, including two donations Monday toward new Dallas County Habitat for Humanity houses and an upbeat report on housing-rehab programs at the Dec. 2 meeting of the Perry City Council.

Meeting Monday in front of the second new house built by Dallas County Habitat for Humanity in the 1700 block of Eight Street, Alliant Energy Key Account Manager Mason Adams and Alliant Manager of Customer Operations Adam Krieger presented a $2,000 check to Dallas County Habitat for Humanity Director Omar Padilla and Habitat board member Trace Schmitt.

“Alliant Energy has been a strong supporter of Habitat for Humanity for a long time,” Adams said. “They do wonderful things for the community, and we are proud to be a partner in their good work.”

A second check — this time a $5,000 donation from Great Western Bank — was also accepted by Padilla and Habitat board member Sven Peterson from Great Western Bank Perry Branch Manager Trace Schmitt, Hickman Branch Manager Nikki Mulbrook and West Des Moines Branch Manager Jasmina Odzakovic.

Along with building new housing units, Habitat for Humanity partners with the Dallas County Local Housing Trust Fund (DCLHTF) for projects to repair and refurbish existing houses. Padilla joined DCLHTF Director Christine Gordon and DCLHTF board member Matt McDevitt on Dec. 2 to present an update to the Perry City Council on the Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation Program.

The DCLHTF asks for an annual per capita contribution of $1 from participating agencies, such as the city of Perry, and those funds are matched four-to-one by the Iowa Finance Authority. They provide and expand safe and affordable housing repairs to low income residents of Dallas County.

Gordon explained some features of the rahab program. To qualify for assistance, a homeowner must meet certain guidelines, she said. Private contractors are used for the repairs, which can run as high as $10,000 per home and are paid by the DCLHTF.

Padilla provided the council members with a report on the financial impact of Habitat’s partnership with the DCLHTF, including the increasing number of families served, how the projects are distributed yearly in Dallas County and the number of projects completed in Perry.

Matt McDevitt, Perry’s representative on the Housing Trust Board, also reported that since 2006 the city of Perry has supported 46 projects and invested $46,057, with a total dollar value of the projects at $405,166.

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